Fashion and technology: innovation in textiles

Fashion and technology: innovation in textiles

In ode to the recent New York fashion week, curiosity about how fabrics are intervened for these marvelous shows, increased my attention towards technology. Late Alexander McQueen, once displayed a white as snow canvas dressed model surrounded by automatic pressure paint machines which all of the sudden transformed this canvas dress into an amazing piece of art and fashionable dress.
Technology seems to be acquiring an important place in our professional lives, as also our domestic lives… (But that would be another post). Concentrating on technology and fashion, a few designers are experimenting with the idea of 3D Printing, LED’s and fiber optics.

3D PRINTING FABRICS

photo: www.aud.ucla.edu

photo: www.aud.ucla.edu

Iris Van Herpen, young dutch fashion designer is revolutionizing the fashion market with the innovative technology by designing futuristic trends that blend both fashion and architecture using 3d printed textiles or better yet, 3d printing her fashion designs. She incorporates architectural themes in her designs, which seriously blends both professions into understanding them as a skin that need a structure in order to set, both of them act this way.  It was very evident that fashion designers would somehow incorporate this technology on textiles, materials that become the main component of design and gives the character the designer wants to express. Although history records that in the late 1990’s a 3d printed dress was designed by Jiri Evenhuis in collaboration with dutch Janne Kyttanenand, both industrial designers. The dress is currently exposed at the MOMA Museum of New York in a permanent collection.

LED AND FIBER OPTICS:
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LED coat Photo: startupfashion.com

LED coat
Photo: startupfashion.com

Lumalive is a product by Philips, intended to produce fabrics with graphic illuminated on the textile. This is conceived by inserting micro LED’s on the textile in the desired design. Fabric and illumination blend delicately without the bumpiness of the the wires under layers of fabric. The scarf showing is worked with fiber optics, another option of “glowing in the dark” style very near to be wearing an outfit from the movie TRON. Yes, we seem to be very near to that future. This futuristic attire is not far from the jacket with prismatic shapes, glowing discretely.

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Mabelle Plasencia

Founder and Editor at INmatteria©
• Architect | LEED AP BD+C, with an intense passion for materiality, innovation, technology and science. • Arquitecta | LEED AP BD+C apasionada por la materialidad, innovación, tecnología y ciencia.