Interview with Bradley Rothenberg: A collision between fashion and 3d printing

Interview with Bradley Rothenberg: A collision between fashion and 3d printing

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More and more the 3D printing technique is present in fashion runways, and Bradley Rothenberg, Brooklyn’s Pratt Institute School of Architecture graduate, from United States, is a dedicated enthusiastic and well-known expert at the forefront of this movement.

Previously, his name appeared next to Swarovski and Shapeways as collaborator for the Victoria’s Secret Annual Show 2013 collection in the production of 3D pieces as Musical Notes Wings for Cara Delevigne as well as Lindsay Ellingson’s Snow Queen look, which were created by being previously modeled and digitally extended around the models’ bodies.

3D Printing - Victoria's Secret (Lindsay Ellingson)_02For the New York Fashion Week of September 2014, Rothenberg’s studio opened the way and cooperated with different companies and important fashion brands as Alice+Olivia, Protagonist and Katya Leonovich in the inclusion of bags, accessories, clothing and textiles made by using this procedure for the Spring Summer 2015 collection, as well as with threeASFOUR, a famed avant-garde fashion designers threesome established in 1998 and previously known as ASFOUR, in which original harnesses were developed applying an interlocking and flexible 3D printing.

In the bargain, he worked alongside Katie Gallagher with whom successfully developed the “Fantasm” collection for Spring Summer 2015 season after 6 months of hard work. This collection has as initial theme, as making reference to the description seen in the studio’s official website, “to capture the unstable constant of nature and its essence, the real composition of an idea or object before they disappear from memory as the smoke that fades into transparency.”

Bradley Rothenberg’s studio gave INmatteria® the splendid opportunity of an interview while the innovative pieces were being manufactured. The visionary architect explained us that many of the processes and codes employed for Victoria’s Secret project were applied for the pieces of the season, which ones were elaborated with various materials besides 3D printing on 24k gold plated nylon, such as resin, sterling silver and thermoplastic elastomers (commonly known as TPE) which are a kind of polymer mixtures that create a material with interlocking structure and thermoplastic and elastomeric properties, thus giving the product a capacity to stretch and, when removing the stress, return to its original shape providing maximum comfort and flexibility to the garment when being used.

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Katie Gallagher

Katie Gallagher

Rothenberg advises to those interested in the inclusion of technology in fashion to teamwork with designers in order to understand their needs and ways of working since much of the project depends on the designer’s idea or inspiration.
Similarly, Bradley Rothenberg has given talks about new technologies in fashion and presented his work in past conferences at the 3D Printshow in Columbia, Museum of Art & Design and at the Eyebeam Art+Techonology Center of Nueva York, among others.

“In every project we are developing new skills as we try to expand upon the methods we have been working on”, says the architect, “we have always had the goal of using 3D printing to make more wearable items”.

Without a doubt, Architect Bradley Rothenberg has an innate creativity to give life to the visions of fashion designers by developing incredible garments and products we had never before imagined possible on the catwalk through the emerging practice of 3D printing, transforming fashion design and taking big steps to the future of the industry by incorporating this technique in clothing manufacturing processes. Through his work we realize that the influence of technology in fashion is emerging stronger.


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Carolina Oliva

Young Fashion Designer and blogger originally from Monterrey, Mexico and inspired by innovation and everything that is uncommon and the uncanny.